Good Communications Drives Trust in Cybersecurity

Communications in Cyber

Our economy, national security, and every possible convenience associated with our way of life are driven by a series of ones and zeroes, and we all need to be more diligent in guarding the gates to our digital networks. For that reason, the time is right for this week’s White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection on the campus of Stanford University.

If we have one takeaway from 2014, it’s that anyone can be the target of a cyber-attack. We began the year examining the Target breach, and ended the year reading embarrassing emails hacked from Sony Pictures. And it wasn’t just the private sector that was hit. Government agencies including the FBI, the Department of Energy, and even the White House were attacked. Each breach throughout the year seemed larger than the last, and experts tell us that 2015 has already given us one of the largest corporate data breaches in history – the attack on Anthem insurance – which impacted upwards of 80 million current and former customers.

The summit agenda

At this week’s summit, President Obama is convening a critical conversation about protecting our digital infrastructure and the personal information and intellectual property of those who use it. Representatives from business, government, academia, law enforcement and the tech sector will work collaboratively to begin building a strategy designed to stop the bad guys – foreign or domestic – before they harm us.

Among the goals for this summit must be sustaining faith and trust in the networks upon which so many of us rely. However, with the intense focus on technology and governance, one of the necessary components needed to do this is often overlooked – developing strategic communications to enhance and support the fight against cybercrimes before breaches occur and after breaches are detected.

Strategic communications within cybersecurity means working with companies and organizations to convey the importance of following proper protocols when handling sensitive personal information or proprietary intellectual property. It means working with government agencies to communicate to the general public in a way that is open and transparent about its activities. It also means communicating with customers about changes in the digital network that will directly impact them and why using these tools, while making their lives easier and more convenient, must be done with thoughtfulness and awareness (no 1,2,3,4 passwords). All of these communications contribute to sustained faith and trust in the digital network.

Communications and cybersecurity

Cybersecurity attacks have fundamentally changed how we view the threats that exist in our lives, and at VOX Global, more and more of our work involves addressing these new demands. This is especially true since the bulk of the recent high profile breaches have involved stealing batches of customer data through vulnerabilities in the network.

Electronic payments have become a critical part of our infrastructure, and the financial services industry has reacted to modern threats by developing new technologies. At VOX, we are working with a number of clients on rolling out new security solutions and educating their customers, employees and business partners about these new solutions.

For policymakers, these new threats raise questions about how they should respond. While the need to take action is often the initial response, kneejerk policies are rarely beneficial in the long run. Organizations need to educate policymakers about the types of laws and regulations that can strengthen cybersecurity while enabling innovation.

And of course, there are those moments when the bad guys enter an unseen open door and chaos ensues. Having a well-conceived response plan involving senior management, communications, legal and IT experts allows an organization to rebound quickly when a breach does occur. Once the fire dies down and the smoke clears, the primary mission for any organization after a breach is restoring faith and trust in the system. Failure to do so could mean the demise of that organization.

While attending the summit this week, I hope to hear from the nation’s leaders and experts in cybersecurity about the importance of strategic communications in this space. Because of the growing impact of ones and zeroes in our lives, we need it now more than ever.

Good Communications Drives Trust in Cybersecurity

Communications in Cyber

Our economy, national security, and every possible convenience associated with our way of life are driven by a series of ones and zeroes, and we all need to be more diligent in guarding the gates to our digital networks. For that reason, the time is right for this week’s White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection on the campus of Stanford University.
If we have one takeaway from 2014, it’s that anyone can be the target of a cyber-attack. We began the year examining the Target breach, and ended the year reading embarrassing emails hacked from Sony Pictures. And it wasn’t just the private sector that was hit. Government agencies including the FBI, the Department of Energy, and even the …

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